Don’t predict the end based on the start

The lives of my five sons can serve as a testament to the fact that a family’s start should never be used to predict its end. The Foster family began when I gave birth to my oldest son, Charles. He was born in February of 1969 while I was only fourteen years of age. Just ten months later after giving birth to him, in the selfsame year I gave birth to my second son, Mark. Keeping in mind that none of my pregnancies were planned, in November of 1970 at sixteen, I gave birth to my third son, Daniel. The following year did not bring any children, but I would tragically lose my own mother. Steve, my fourth son, came in January of 1972. He came two months before I turned eighteen. It was that very year that I lost my grandmother—the last adult female close to me. In February of 1973 at the age of eighteen, I gave birth to my fifth and final son, Frank. Before I knew it, I was eighteen with no mother, no grandmother, five sons in tote, and no husband.

FlowerTrees-2393

Based on statistics and the views of most people in our society, my sons were destined for a life of crime and poverty. Contradictory to popular belief, I was very blessed to have all five of my sons graduate from college with not one but two degrees each. in 1999, Charles graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Electronic Technology and later obtained his MBA in 2007. Mark earned a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry in 1993, and he also obtained a MBA in 2007 along with Charles. My third son, Daniel, graduated from college with a Bachelor’s degree in 1994 and a Master’s degree in 1997—both were in Electrical Engineering. Steve graduated from college with a Bachelor’s degree in Economics in 1997 and a MBA in 2004. My fifth son, Frank, came out of college in 1995 with a Bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering, and he too would earn his MBA in 2006. So much for the critics, a horrible start did not translate into a horrible ending.

 

Photo by Phinishing Touches LLC

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